VALORIZZARE DIFENDERE SALVAGUARDARE LA VAL DI SIEVE

L' Associazione Valdisieve persegue le finalità di tutelare l'ambiente, il paesaggio, la salute, i beni culturali, il corretto assetto urbanistico, la qualità della vita e la preservazione dei luoghi da ogni forma d'inquinamento, nell'ambito territoriale dei comuni della Valdisieve e limitrofi.

mercoledì 9 dicembre 2015

Il "The Guardian" intervista il sindaco di Firenze Nardella e TIZIANO CARDOSI del comitato No tunnel TAV

The office of Dario Nardella, mayor of Florence, in the Palazzo Vecchio, the seat of government in the Renaissance city since 1290, looks as if it has not changed much over the centuries, apart from the iPhone and iPad on the desk.
Inside the hall of Clement VII, as the office is called, a 16th-century fresco by Giorgio Vasari depicts the siege that put Florence back into the grips of the powerful Medici family. Then, as now, the city skyline captured in the fresco is dominated by Brunelleschi’s Duomo, a symbol of Florentine ingenuity.
But for many vocal and disgruntled Florentines, the Palazzo Vecchio is looking less like a stately symbol of civic pride and more like an estate agency.
Faced with the proposed sale of the Rotonda del Brunelleschi, the transformation of a former military barracks into a five-star hotel and spa, and the expected refurbishment of a municipal theatre into luxury “Fifth Avenue-style” apartments and an underground car park, activists such as Tiziano Cardosi are trying to stall what they see as the rapid degradation of a jewel of civilisation into a “Disneyland” for the well-off.
“The whole historic centre is a pedestrian centre. It is not for citizens, though, just for big groups of tourists and rich [foreign] students. This is a dying town,” he says. “We are building big hotels only for rich people. We are selling everything.” Cardosi complains that a Florentine cannot even buy bread in the city centre any more because the shops only sell gelato to please tourists, or alcohol to please students – groups that represent the economic lifeblood of the city.
Now a new voice has joined the chorus of concern. A letter sent in May by Unesco to the Italian authorities, and which has only recently become public, echoes some of the litany of complaints from Florentines about proposed changes in the city. The letter, signed by Kishore Rao, director of Unesco’s World HeritageCentre, not only raises questions about the sale and “change of use” of many historic palaces, but also about the “absence of a tourist strategy” and the potential impact of a number of big infrastructure projects, including a new high-speed railway line and a proposed tram line that Unesco advisers say need to be carefully assessed given Florence’s “very high risk rate” of flooding.
Inside the hall of Clement VII, as the office is called, a 16th-century fresco by Giorgio Vasari depicts the siege that put Florence back into the grips of the powerful Medici family. Then, as now, the city skyline captured in the fresco is dominated by Brunelleschi’s Duomo, a symbol of Florentine ingenuity.
But for many vocal and disgruntled Florentines, the Palazzo Vecchio is looking less like a stately symbol of civic pride and more like an estate agency.
Faced with the proposed sale of the Rotonda del Brunelleschi, the transformation of a former military barracks into a five-star hotel and spa, and the expected refurbishment of a municipal theatre into luxury “Fifth Avenue-style” apartments and an underground car park, activists such as Tiziano Cardosi are trying to stall what they see as the rapid degradation of a jewel of civilisation into a “Disneyland” for the well-off.
“The whole historic centre is a pedestrian centre. It is not for citizens, though, just for big groups of tourists and rich [foreign] students. This is a dying town,” he says. “We are building big hotels only for rich people. We are selling everything.” Cardosi complains that a Florentine cannot even buy bread in the city centre any more because the shops only sell gelato to please tourists, or alcohol to please students – groups that represent the economic lifeblood of the city.
Now a new voice has joined the chorus of concern. A letter sent in May by Unesco to the Italian authorities, and which has only recently become public, echoes some of the litany of complaints from Florentines about proposed changes in the city. The letter, signed by Kishore Rao, director of Unesco’s World HeritageCentre, not only raises questions about the sale and “change of use” of many historic palaces, but also about the “absence of a tourist strategy” and the potential impact of a number of big infrastructure projects, including a new high-speed railway line and a proposed tram line that Unesco advisers say need to be carefully assessed given Florence’s “very high risk rate” of flooding.
“[We] observe that several large-scale and medium-size projects with the potential to impact on the outstanding universal value of the world heritage property, its attributes, integrity and authenticity, have been planned since long ago and/or initiated without informing in advance the World Heritage Committee via its secretariat, as is required,” said the letter, written by the International Council on Monuments and Sites, which advises Unesco on the conservation and protection of cultural heritage.
Both Unesco and Nardella’s office insist that the communication, a hot topic locally, is a routine exchange and request for information, and that Florence’s prized status as a world heritage site is not in danger. Only the Arabian Oryx Sanctuary in Oman and the Dresden Elbe Valley in Germany have ever had their designations removed. But the letter has forced the mayor on to the defensive. “We are responding to all the points that have been raised. We are very sure about the city’s strategy to conserve the cultural heritage. In fact, Florence has some of the best practices and experience of all the Unesco sites in Italy,” Nardella said.
The 40-year-old mayor is part of a new generation of energetic, reformist politicians who are trying to shake up Italy’s bureaucracy. Before becoming mayor he served as the deputy to his predecessor, Matteo Renzi, who is now prime minister and the face of the centre-left Democratic party.
The mayor claims he has a strategy to deal with the issues raised by Unesco: first, to try to encourage tourists to visit the surrounding areas of Florence and not just crowd the city centre – a new science museum is being planned in the outskirts – and, second, to improve the “quality” of the tourists who are visiting. He acknowledges that preserving the city while also overseeing its economic development and maintaining urban activities is a constant challenge. “I agree with these people [activist critics] when they tell me we have too many tourists. But the question is not about how to close the city, but how to change their attitude,” he said.
Nardella has proposed an end to the cycle of “eat and run” by doubling the tax on tour buses. He is trying to rein in other abuses, too, including a proposal that will curb the sale of alcohol after 9pm. He points, too, to rules that will support Italian artisans who sell goods in historic areas such as the Ponte Vecchio. He bristles at the idea that the Florentine bridge could come to resemble Venice’s Ponte di Rialto, which is full of souvenir hawkers.
The mayor defends the sale and lease of various city properties under his watch, given that all new construction in the city centre is outlawed. “Only buildings with a lesser cultural value are for sale because we have a very clear national law that dictates that we cannot sell the Palazzo Vecchio,” he said. “And we oblige private people to restore the historical buildings and keep them in good condition. It is important to support private investment for high-quality projects.”
While not all of the city’s plans are under his control – the sale of the Rotonda del Brunelleschi is not under his purview – his overall aim is to put “abandoned” buildings to use and avoid further degradation.
For Cardosi, not enough attention is being paid to Florence’s fragility. Beneath the grand palazzos and squares lies what was essentially a swamp that cannot handle more excavation and – in his view – useless infrastructure.
A feasibility study is being conducted into a new “mini-metro”. In its letter, Unesco warns that the impact of such an underground system “seems unknown”. But Nardella will have none of it. “Does London have an underground? Yes. Does Paris? Yes. Does Madrid? Yes. Does Rome? Yes. So why can’t Florence?”
Nardella has proposed an end to the cycle of “eat and run” by doubling the tax on tour buses. He is trying to rein in other abuses, too, including a proposal that will curb the sale of alcohol after 9pm. He points, too, to rules that will support Italian artisans who sell goods in historic areas such as the Ponte Vecchio. He bristles at the idea that the Florentine bridge could come to resemble Venice’s Ponte di Rialto, which is full of souvenir hawkers.
The mayor defends the sale and lease of various city properties under his watch, given that all new construction in the city centre is outlawed. “Only buildings with a lesser cultural value are for sale because we have a very clear national law that dictates that we cannot sell the Palazzo Vecchio,” he said. “And we oblige private people to restore the historical buildings and keep them in good condition. It is important to support private investment for high-quality projects.”
While not all of the city’s plans are under his control – the sale of the Rotonda del Brunelleschi is not under his purview – his overall aim is to put “abandoned” buildings to use and avoid further degradation.
For Cardosi, not enough attention is being paid to Florence’s fragility. Beneath the grand palazzos and squares lies what was essentially a swamp that cannot handle more excavation and – in his view – useless infrastructure.
A feasibility study is being conducted into a new “mini-metro”. In its letter, Unesco warns that the impact of such an underground system “seems unknown”. But Nardella will have none of it. “Does London have an underground? Yes. Does Paris? Yes. Does Madrid? Yes. Does Rome? Yes. So why can’t Florence?”
°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°
(di seguito il testo dell’articolo tradotto in italiano con l’ausilio di un traduttore automatico - NDR. traduzione copia-incollata da questo articolo a questo link: http://pratonelmondointernal.altervista.org/firenzele-folli-politiche-di-nardella-attirano-lattenzione-della-stampa-estera/)

Firenze cerca una classe migliore di turisti per condividere i suoi tesori medievali assediati

L’Unesco si è unita ai critici che esprimono  preoccupazioni per la mancanza di una strategia per il futuro

L’ufficio di Dario Nardella, sindaco di Firenze, in Palazzo Vecchio, sede del governo della città rinascimentale dal 1290, sembra non sia cambiato molto nel corso dei secoli, a parte l’iPhone e iPad sulla scrivania.
All’interno della sala di Clemente VII, mentre l’ufficio è chiamato, un affresco 16° secolo da Giorgio Vasari descrive l’assedio di Firenze che ha messo nuovamente dentro le impugnature della potente famiglia dei Medici. Allora, come oggi, lo skyline della città mostrato dall’affresco è dominato dalla Cupola del Brunelleschi del Duomo, simbolo dell’ingegno fiorentino.
Ma per molti fiorentini vocali e scontenti, il Palazzo Vecchio è alla ricerca meno come un simbolo maestoso di orgoglio civico e più come un’agenzia immobiliare.
Di fronte alla proposta di vendita della Cupola del Brunelleschi, la trasformazione di una ex caserma militare in un albergo a cinque stelle e centro benessere, e la ristrutturazione previsto di un teatro comunale in appartamenti di lusso “in stile Quinta Avenue” e un parcheggio sotterraneo, attivisti come Tiziano Cardosi stanno cercando di apporsi a  ciò che vedono come la rapida degradazione di un gioiello della civiltà in una “Disneyland” per i benestanti.
“Tutto il centro storico è un centro pedonale. Non è per i cittadini, però, solo per gruppi di turisti e studenti ricchi [stranieri]. Questa è una città che muore “, dice. “Stiamo costruendo grandi alberghi solo per le persone ricche. Stiamo vendendo tutto”. Cardosi lamenta che un fiorentino non può nemmeno comprare il pane nel centro della città più perché i negozi vendono solo gelato per compiacere i turisti, o alcool per compiacere gli studenti. Gruppi che rappresentano la linfa vitale per l’economia della città.
Ora una nuova voce si è unita al coro di preoccupazione. Una lettera inviata maggio dall’Unesco alle autorità italiane, e che solo di recente è stata resa pubblica, riecheggia alcuni delle lamentele da Fiorentini circa modifiche proposte in città. La lettera, firmata da Kishore Rao, direttore del patrimonio mondiale HeritageCentre, solleva non solo domande circa la vendita e “cambio di destinazione” di molti palazzi storici, ma anche sulla “mancanza di una strategia turistica” e il potenziale impatto di un numero di grandi progetti infrastrutturali, tra cui una nuova linea ferroviaria ad alta velocità e una linea di tram proposto che i consiglieri Unesco dicono devono essere attentamente valutate dato “tasso di rischio molto elevato” di Firenze, di inondazioni.
 “[Noi] Osserviamo che diversi progetti su larga scala e medie dimensioni con il potenziale di impatto sul valore universale eccezionale della proprietà del patrimonio mondiale, i suoi attributi, l’integrità e l’autenticità, sono stati pianificati da tempo fa e / o avviati senza informare in anticipo il Comitato del Patrimonio Mondiale con il suo segretariato, come è necessario “, ha detto la lettera, scritta dal Consiglio Internazionale dei Monumenti e Siti, che consiglia l’Unesco sulla conservazione e la tutela del patrimonio culturale.
l’Unesco e l’ufficio di Nardella insistono sul fatto che la comunicazione, sia un tema caldo a livello locale, è uno scambio di routine e richiesta di informazioni, e che lo status pregiato di Firenze come sito del patrimonio mondiale non è in pericolo. Solo l’Arabian Oryx Sanctuary in Oman e la Valle dell’Elba a Dresda, in Germania si sono viste rimuovere le loro designazioni. Ma la lettera ha costretto il sindaco sulla difensiva. “Stiamo rispondendo a tutti i punti che sono stati sollevati. Siamo molto sicuri circa la strategia della città di conservare il patrimonio culturale. Infatti, Firenze ha alcune delle migliori pratiche e delle esperienze di tutti i siti Unesco in Italia “, ha detto Nardella.
Il sindaco quarantenne è parte di una nuova generazione di energetici, politici riformisti che stanno cercando di scuotere la burocrazia in Italia. Prima di diventare sindaco ha prestato servizio come vice al suo predecessore, Matteo Renzi, che ora è presidente del Consiglio e il volto del partito democratico di centro-sinistra.
Le rivendicazioni del sindaco sono costituite da una strategia per affrontare le questioni sollevate dall’Unesco: in primo luogo, per cercare di incoraggiare i turisti a visitare le zone circostanti di Firenze e non solo affollano il centro della città – un nuovo museo della scienza è in programma nei dintorni – e , in secondo luogo, per migliorare la “qualità” dei turisti che visitano. Egli riconosce che la conservazione della città, mentre anche supervisionare il suo sviluppo economico e il mantenimento di attività urbane è una sfida costante.“Sono d’accordo con questa gente [i critici di attivisti] quando mi dicono che abbiamo troppi turisti. Ma la questione non è su come chiudere la città, ma come cambiare il loro atteggiamento “, ha detto.
Nardella si anima quando descrive la quintessenza “cattivi turisti” che trascorrono non più di un paio d’ore in città. Vengono da Roma o da Livorno al mattino su un tour bus e le loro guide sanno dove prendere loro di comprare un ricordo, ha detto. “Allora il cibo – una Coca-Cola e un panino. No visita al museo, solo una foto dalla piazza, l’autobus per tornare e poi a Venezia, “ha detto. “Non vogliamo i turisti così“.
Nardella ha proposto la fine del ciclo di “mordi e fuggi”, raddoppiando la tassa sui bus turistici. Sta cercando di tenere a freno altri abusi, troppo, tra cui una proposta che frenare la vendita di alcolici dopo le 9. Egli sottolinea, anche, per le regole che dovranno sostenere gli artigiani italiani che vendono beni in settori storici come il Ponte Vecchio. Ha setole all’idea che il ponte fiorentino potrebbe venire ad assomigliare a Venezia Ponte di Rialto, che è piena di venditori ambulanti di souvenir.”
Il sindaco difende la vendita e locazione di varie proprietà della città sotto la sua vigilanza, dato che tutte le nuove edificazioni nel centro della città sono  fuorilegge. “Solo gli edifici con un valore culturale minore sono in vendita perché abbiamo una legge nazionale molto chiaro che impone che non possiamo vendere Palazzo Vecchio”, ha detto. “E noi obblighiamo privati ​​per ripristinare gli edifici storici e conservarli in buone condizioni. E ‘importante sostenere gli investimenti privati ​​per progetti di alta qualità. “
Anche se non tutti i piani della città sono sotto il suo controllo – la vendita della Cupola del Brunelleschi non è sotto la sua competenza – il suo obiettivo generale è quello di mettere gli edifici “abbandonati” da utilizzare ed evitare ulteriore degrado.
Per Cardosi, non viene rivolta abbastanza attenzione alla fragilità di Firenze. Sotto i grandi palazzi e le piazze si trova quella che era essenzialmente una palude che non può gestire più scavo e – a suo avviso – le infrastrutture inutili.
Uno studio di fattibilità è stato condotto in un nuovo “mini-metro”. Nella sua lettera, l’Unesco avverte che l’impatto di un tale sistema sotterraneo “sembra sconosciuto”. Ma Nardella avrà niente di tutto ciò. “Londra ha un tunnel sotterraneo? Sì. Ce l’ha Parigi? Sì.   Ce l’ha Madrid? Sì. Ce l’ha Roma? Sì. Allora perché non può averlo Firenze? “